Editorial on OA

As noted by Peter Suber in Another TA editorial on OA (Open Access News, September 1, 2008), there’s an editorial in the Wiley-Blackwell journal Epilepsia, entitled: Public (open) access policy, by Philip A Schwartzkroin and Simon D Shorvon, Epilepsia 2008(Aug); 49(8): 1295.

The editorial (which isn’t freely accessible) summarizes information that can freely accessed via Wiley-Blackwell and Open Access.

It’s noteworthy that Wiley-Blackwell will post the accepted versions of articles by NIH grant-holders to PubMed Central, to be made publicly available 12 months after publication. However, the full text of articles in Epilepsia are already freely accessible online after one year. So, unless or until the NIH public access policy is modified from permitting a 12-month embargo on OA to a mandate the only permits shorter embargoes (such a 6 months), little has been gained from mandating the deposition, into the PubMed Central repository, of NIH-supported postprints that have been accepted for publication in Wiley-Blackwell journals.

Added September 2, 2008: Another Wiley-Blackwell journal has published an editorial, by Allan D Kirk and Daniel R Salomon, entitled: AJT’s Response to the National Institutes of Health Public Access Regulations, American Journal of Transplantation, published online August 22 2008. See: Another TA response to the the NIH OA policy, Peter Suber, Open Access News, September 1, 2008.

Again, the editorial isn’t OA, and has no abstract. However, one sentence in the editorial is especially noteworthy:

In response to this new regulatory mandate, the Editorial Board of the American Journal of Transplantation has unanimously approved a new policy that all publications accepted to the Journal, regardless of their source of funding support, will be automatically posted to the National Library of Medicine PubMed Central upon acceptance. Articles will be automatically available within the 1-year time frame required by the NIH.

Unlike research articles in the Wiley-Blackwell journal Epilepsia, the new access policy of the American Journal of Transplantation will be applicable to “all publications accepted to the Journal, regardless of their source of funding support“. However, it should be pointed out that research articles in the American Journal of Transplantation, like those in Epilepsia, are OA one year after publication. See: Wiley-Blackwell Open Access Backfiles.

So, again, little has been gained from mandating the deposition, into the PubMed Central repository, of NIH-supported postprints that have been accepted for publication in this Wiley-Blackwell journal.

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: